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about civil-rights. the second part of your question, how did he get kennedy -- it takes a lot of pages in this book to talk about all the things he does but the thing he does on the instant, this bill appears to be totally dead. he says didn't someone file a discharge petition? discharge petition had been filed -- this bill was in a committee that was never going to let it out. wasn't even the senate. still in the house rules committee which was shared by judge howard w. smith and would even give a date. the bill was going nowhere. johnson remembers someone filed a discharge petition to take away from that committee. that was -- a discharge petition ever -- never passed. violation of house rules and no president had ever gotten behind one before. johnson calls the representative who introduces it and representative of missouri has been told by the leaders dropped this thing and listen to johnson in this telephone call to see a genius in human nature because the first half of the call, we can't violate the house pre ♪ >> this is book tv's live coverage of the national books s festival
program, civil-rights and everyone of his major -- was stalled by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress, to see him get that program up and running and has it, ramming it through. to watch lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination is a lesson in what a president can do if he not only knows all the levers to pull but has the will. in lyndon johnson's case almost vicious drive to do it, to win, to say over and over again as i am always saying to myself when i do the research look what he is doing. look what he is doing here. i don't say i succeeded but i tried to explain that in my books. to me, to see him doing that is something that is not only fascinating but revelatory given true insight into how power works in washington. there is another reason i don't get tired of doing these books on lyndon johnson. you are always learning something new. that goes even if what you are researching is something that has been written about a thousand or ten thousand times already as the case in the centerpiece of this book, the assassination of presid
for civil rights. "america's unwritten constitution" he's professor of law at the yale law school. president for the alliance of justice system. it is wonderful to have you here. this week, we have two blockbuster political events on the calendar. the first presidential debate and the return of the supreme court to washington. they will hear arguments since the first time on the affordable care act. a start and fresh reminder of the power of the court. the court returns with a docket packed with high profile cases and others likely to be heard. it's strangely almost entirely absent from the presidential campaign. it becomes alarming when you look at the age of the justices. 76, 76, 74, and the oldest is 79 years old. let's not forget she's the fifth vote to uphold a decision in roe v. wade. >> i hope to appoint justices to the supreme court that will follow the law and the constitution. it will be my impression they will reverse row v. wade. >> it's very likely the next president of the united states will appoint several justices to the supreme court. that often is the most lasting legacy of
, they do have a lot to feel guilty for. it was liberal democrats that were the ones fighting civil rights for 100 years after the civil war in addition to fighting the civil war. and they just write these revisionist histories and then play act themselves being civil rights champions. um, i mean, the quote from bill clinton. on his first inaugural as governor, he was embracing orville -- [inaudible] who stood in the schoolhouse during little rock. democrat bill clinton invites democrat segregationist jay william full bright to the white house to give him the medal of freedom in which he cites fulbright, you know, he teaches us that the russians are people too. but fulbright didn't ever see that black americans were people, too, since he signed the southern manifesto, voted against the '64 civil rights act. cheryl: you really in the book go after politicians, and you say they have used the black community to their own benefit. >> oh, yes. cheryl: give me some specific examples. >> well, that's the funny thing. while being pompous and engaging in this moral training as if they are the champ
than our century's worth of progress in civil rights. now the tide is turning. inch by inch, state by state, we've been reclaiming our rights and turning back the wave of voter suppression. we saw it when the justice department stepped in to block the laws in texas, south carolina and florida. we saw it when governors in six states all but one were democrats, vetoed voter i.d. laws. they were champions of democracy to do so. and we saw it when state and federal courts rejected laws in eight states, including today's major ruling in pennsylvania. this morning a judge blocked pennsylvania's controversial voter i.d. from going into effect before the november election. after it was revealed that hundreds of thousands of voters face the real pocket that they would not be allowed to vote. but now this unjust law will not be in effect on election day in this critical swing state. it's a stunning rebuke to republicans and their shameless attempt to rig the system. just remember one of those state top gop lawmakers slipped up and said what these laws are all about. >> voter i.d., which is g
ever complaining about ministers who are involved in the civil rights movement or in the anti- vietnam war demonstrations or about black preachers who've been so involved in american politics. is it only conservative ministers that you object to? >> no. what i object to -- [applause] -- what i object to -- what i object to is someone seeking to use his faith to question the faith of another or to use that faith and seek to use the power of government to impose it on others. a minister who is in civil rights or in the conservative movement, because he believes his faith instructs him to do that, i admire. the fact that the faith speaks to us and that we are moral people, hopefully, i accept and rejoice in. it's when you try to use that to undermine the integrity of private political -- or private religious faith and the use of the state is where -- for the most personal decisions in american life -- that's where i draw the line. >> thank you. now, mr. president, rebuttal. >> yes, it's very difficult to rebut, because i find myself in so much agreement with mr. mondale. i, too, want that
this morning. >>> the naacp is pressing the u.n. to send observers to monitor this year's elections. the civil rights group believes up to 6 million americans are being blocked from voting because of felony criminal records. >>> in spain, dozens of protesters have been injured in clashes with police. they're angry over cuts in public employee salaries, health and education as spain races to deal with massive debt. >>> in russia, this is incredible video. it shows a truck driver literally walking away from a crash with another big rig completely unharmed. he was hurled from his cab at the moment of impact but amazingly landed right side up with barely a scratch. >>> and finally, this is the deepest view space you have ever seen. the hubble telescope has sent back a picture more than 13 billion light years in the making. it's a collage of views, more than 5,000 galaxies captured over ten years. >>> and now here's an early look at how wall street's going to kick off the day. the dow closed at 13,457 after stumbling 101 points yesterday. the s&p dropped 15. the nasdaq tumbled 43. taking a look at
this year's elections. the civil rights group believes up to 6 million americans are being blocked from voting because of felony criminal records. >>> in spain, dozens of protesters have been injured in clashes witholice. they're angry over cuts in public employee salaries, health and education as spain races to deal with massive debt. >>> in russia, this is incredible video. it shows a truck driver literally walking away from a crwith another big rig he was hurled from his cab at the moment of impact but amazingly landed right up with barely a scratch. >>> and finally, this is the deepest view of space you have ever seen. the hubble telescopeas sent back picture me an 13 billliyearin t ng it's a collage of views, more than 5,000 galaxies captured over ten years. >>> now a first look at this lics.ng's dish of scrambled next month, stevie wonder is among the stars performing at benefit concert for president obama in los angeles. the hollywood reporter also says that on the bill with wonder will be jennifer hudson and kat perry. >>> michael bloomberg is on the nuerneheer in political offi
that that dollar is wisely spent. i think they stand for civil rights. i know they're all for education in science and training, which i strongly support. they want these young people to have a chance to get jobs and the rest. i think the business community wants to get involved. i think they're asking for new and creative ways to try to reach it with everyone involved. i think that's part of it. i think also that the american people want a balanced program that gives us long-term growth so that they're not having to take money that's desperate to themselves and their families and give it to someone else. i'm opposed to that, too. >> and now it is time for our rebuttal for this period. mr. president? >> yes. the connection that's been made again between the deficit and the interest rates -- there is no connection between them. there is a connection between interest rates and inflation, but i would call to your attention that in 1981 while we were operating still on the carter-mondale budget that we inherited -- that the interest rates came down from 211/2, down toward the 12 or 13 figure. and whil
seems to get all the credit for signing the civil rights act. it was actually eisenhower who got the ball rolling. >> yeah. and for 100 years after the civil war fought by republicans to end slavery, it's republicans constantly introducing civil rights bills that were blocked by democrats? why is it that the 1964 civil rights act is treated as if it's the only civil rights act in u.s. history? because that was the first one in history ever pushed by a democrat. and by the way, lbj, when he was a senator, opposed the 1957 and 1960 civil rights act being pushed by eisenhower and nixon. and if i could just say about chris matthews, as curious as that clip, he cites all the black people coming up to him and cites black people in other country whom he refers to as african-americans. that's because here in america, he doesn't have any black friends. he doesn't have any black neighbors. his son, i have the url and the book, there is a big picture of his son's wedding. 100 people in the church. not a black face in the group. any republican with the facts of chris matthews life would be c
." this is a very old statute enacted by the first congress. it has sat dormant for 170 years. in some civil right type folks picked it up. -- been some civil right type folks picked it up and started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign. the defendant is foreign. the tour took place in some foreign place. they say you have jurisdiction over this. courts have been going for this. they have been allowing some of these cases to go forward. this case raised the question of the of -- in this particular case, it took place in nigeria. the guy says the nigerian government committed these against me. they mistreated me. these foreign will company's work implicit -- foreign companies were implicit. so i am wanting to sue the oil companies in federal court. the defendant say this is not apply to corporations. he cannot actually sue a corporation under the statute. that was their claim. they did something very unusual. they actually said we want to consider a broader question. we would like you to brief not just this question of does it apply to corporations, but also doesn't apply extraterritor
sapphire preferred. >>> the supreme court reconvenes monday with critical civil rights cases on the agenda. but it's november 6th, presidential election day, that could be the biggest day for the future of the court. the average age of the supreme court justices is 66. four justices are in their mid to late 70s. the ideologically divided bench could swing either way depending on who sits in the oval office when the next justice retires. joining me is patricia ann millate head of the firm's supreme court practice. good morning. >> good morning. >> i know you've argued 31 cases before the supreme court. has that experience given you any insight into who might be the next justice to retire? >> well, i think it's very likely that the next president's going to have at least one, and maybe even two appointments on the court. obviously just statistically, if you look at age, justice ginsburg, ruth bader ginsburg is the most likely one if you just look at age. the longest serving ones, justices scalia and kennedy on the court. those type of factors obviously weigh in. >> i'm going to have myr d ja
moving and revealing than as the secret witness to the struggle for civil rights. the great moral issue tearing the country apart. and after a young man named james meredith creates a crisis by enrolling in the all-white university of mississippi. >> mr. president, please, why don't you, can't you give an order. >> how can i remove him, governor, when there's a riot in the streets. >> i took an oath. >> the problem, is governor, i've got my responsibilities just like you have yours. >> reporter: kennedy sent in the u.s. marshals and the national guard to restore order, and james meredith became the first black graduate of ole miss. then 11 days before he is assassinated -- >> tuesday, november 12th. >> the last words on the last tape are about the hard battle ahead. >> and so our lot becomes more difficult. >> our lot becomes more difficult. and that's it. last word. >> i love that. i think that's really -- i thought that was really moving. and obviously, knowing what happened. he understood how difficult all of this really was. >> wow. >> just fascinating stuff. 260 hours worth of the
that's played out in states across the country. civil rights groups pushing back against voter i.d. laws enact aed by republican-controlled legislatures since 2010. >> the effort to actually change the rules of the game at the last minute is a really misguided effort. >> reporter: wendy wiser is with the brandon center for justice and warns hundreds of thousands of voters may not have necessary i.d. they include the elderly, college students, poor people, blacks and latinos. groups that traditionally vote democratic. >> we need to do everything we can to ensure that there's no fraud in our elections. but what we shouldn't be doing is passing unnecessary laws that needlessly include eligible americans from participating equally in our democracy. >> reporter: the new voter i.d. laws only protect against voter impersonation. in pennsylvania, a traditional swing states lawyers for both sides include no cases of fraud. still says john fund an expert on the subject. >> if someone walks in and votes the name of a dead person and don't need to show i.d. how likely is that dead person to
win and my retort is if you look back over the years, from women's suffrage, civil rights, to more recently the alternative ener movement, have been borne from third parties garn hing enough votes away from the two major political parties so engrained in the status quo that they never impose the sweeping changes so i hope you can comment on the role of third parties not necessarily in winning elections but in changing the agenda to the point where we get the changes we end up treasuring over the next century. host: thank you for the call. dr. jill stein. guest: thank you for making that point, which is very important. in fact, what so many people call progress in this country, whether you talk about women getting the right to vote, the abbitionist slavery, the protection of workers in the workplace, the right to organize, the 40 hour work week, child labor laws, social social security, the new deal, you name it, all of these have come out of independent third parties, because as you say, the party that is are bought and paid for by large corporations which are part of the status qu
of cases that could change the landscape of civil rights in america. fr frances coe, nbc news. >>> and now here's a look at some other stories making news early today in america. in maine, a group of strangers spring into action when an elderly woman drove her car into the portland harbor. the band of good samaritans pulled the 84-year-old out of her car moments before it sank. the woman is in stable condition. some of the rescuers had to be treated for hypothermia. >>> carmageddon 2 has come to an end just in time for this morning's rush hour in california. the demolition job that shut down a portion of l.a.'s 405 freeway hit a snag when a column collapsed. work crews completed a major component of the four-year expansion project. >>> in kentucky, a test of strength was on display. 34 teams of 20 people battled to see who could pull a 757 cargo plane 12 feet in the fastest time. the competitors showed the money as well as some muscle. all of the teams raised money for the special olympics. >>> finally, hawaiians continued their love affair with spasm hundreds gathered to build the world's
is inherently unequal. and in the 1960s opening new vistas of civil rights for individuals. and now like much of the nation, polarized and often riven with disaffection while it tends towards what is viewed as conservative world view. the court over its history has given euphoric moments of progress and unfortunate stagnation of the status quo that is desperately needed shaking. but just for clear here's to hoping that justices breyer, ginsberg, society mayor kagan can find the fifth vote that they need to move us forward not backwards. that's my view. on current tv. >>i feel like i don't even know you. >>just stay on your side of the screen, okay? >>brought to you by geico. 15 minutes could save 15% or more on car insurance. visit geico.com for a free rate >> eliot: call it a total and complete failure of the justice system. call it a modern day witch-hunt. call it anything but the way the legal system is supposed to work in this country. it's become a well-known story. in 1993 three children were brutally murdered in the woods of west memphis arkansas. three men who were later to become kno
the alien torched statute. -- alien tort statute. any civil action by agent alien's right toward the only committed and a violation of the law of nations or a treaty of the united states, this is an old statute enacted by the first congress which sat dormant for 170 years. then some civil-rights folks pick them up and they started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign, the defendant is foreign, and report to a place in some foreign place. they come into in new york federal court and say you have jurisdiction over this and courts have been allowing some of these cases to go forward, strange as it sounds. this case raised the question -- this takes place in nigeria and the guy says he mistreated me, tortured me and so forth. these foreign oil companies were composite and help the nigerian company do this to me -- these companies work implicit. you can actually sue incorporation under this statute and that was their claim last year. the u.s. supreme court heard arguments in the case and did something very unusual -- they actually said to the parties we want to consider a broader q
button topics including same-sex marriage, and a challenge to a key civil rights law, the voting rights act, requiring states with a history of discrimination to get approval from the feds before making any changes to election and voting rules. shannon covers the court for us and is live in washington. shannon, what is left to be settled here? >>guest: well, when it comes to the health care law you will remember back if june the court uphell the individual mandate and rules on other issues involving the expansion of medicaid but there are many other portions of the law the high court did not rule on including the employer mandate. that is one of the elements that the liberty university has been challenging from the going. today the court indicated it is willing to take the issue seriously by giving the administration 30 days to respond to a request by liberty university for a rehearing on that issue. >>shepard: that is one thing. what are the odds it will make it before the court? >>guest: many court watchers who believe the university has a good shot at a second chance. >> they have go
to get ahead of things, the plaintiffs here are attorneys, civil rights activists and others who are in regular contact with people overseas particularly people who might well be the subject of electronic surveillance by the federal government and they are challenging the law that allows electronic surveillance, this wiretapping because they're concerned that their case will be picked up. they're claiming to have standing to challenge this law because even though the surveillance might be directed overseas to people they're talking to get their dedication will get picked up in the course of that surveillance and so therefore they have the right to challenge it in court. that is the standing issue we we are dealing with. just to get to the merits for a minute, and the aftermath of the exposÉ in the mid-70's about various abuses in the intelligence community and in short in short is set up a system by which the executive branch would have to go to the court surveillance court here in d.c. and get permission when they wanted to do wiretapping for national security purpose to give s
about the state of the oakland police department as civil rights opponents attempt to put the police department under state police. the judge overseeing today's hearing had said quan could face punitive action if she did not testify today as she had missed her last court date siting city business. city rights opponents say oakland have failed to follow reform. a federal judge is scheduled to consider the issue in december. >>> all you need is a smart phone to ride munni for free. that's according to a firm that specializes in mobile security. it says it's discovered a flaw in the system. the glitch allows those who are computer savvy to reset the value on muni's system to not pay. >>> the purple onion shut down last night and today remnants of the comedy club went up for sale. items included musical instruments and pictures of the club's old headliners. the purple onion lost its lease after the building was sold. but last night the owner told us he plans to carry out the tradition at other venues around town. >>> that fog is pushing inland right now it's over in berkeley. it's trying
quan testified about the state of the oakland police department as civil rights opponents attempt to put the police department under state police. the judge overseeing today's hearing had said quan could face punitive action if she did not testify today as she had missed her last court date siting city business. city rights opponents say oakland have failed to follow reform. a federal judge is scheduled to consider the issue in december. >>> all you need is a smart phone to ride munni for free. that's according to a firm that specializes in mobile security. it says it's discovered a flaw in the system. the glitch allows those who are computer savvy to reset the value on muni's system to not pay. >>> the purple onion shut down last night and today remnants of the comedy club went up for sale. items included musical instruments and pictures of the club's old headliners. the purple onion lost its lease after the building was sold. but last night the owner told us he plans to carry out the tradition at other venues around town. >>> that fog is pushing inland right now it's over in ber
smart. ♪ . >> three months after supreme court justice moved to the right and passed obama care. pete williams has some details. >> reporter: larry, this is shaping up to be a court term dominated by civil rights beginning with a case that will be argued next week on affirmative action, colleges nationwide use it believing that a more racially diverse campus provides a better education. the court gave a green light to that practice seven years ago, but since then has become more skeptical. sandra day o'connor who has since left the court. the court will almost certainly hear a challenge to the voting rights act. the section that says states have to get federal permission before they make any changes to their elections if those states have a history of discrimination. the states say the map that's used to determine how they need to get that clearance is out of date and three years ago the court agreed with that. and almost certainly it will take up the challenge to the defense of marriage act. that's the act signed by president clint preside president clinton that says that -- >> many
years ago. it brought together civil rights leaders then and now. i was too young in '65, so were you, but we're not too young now. we must maintain what they won in '65. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> does romney like you? let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. on the way to denver. let me start with this brand new nbc/wall street journal poll out tonight. what it shows in addition to an obama leading that's hardening is a deep concern that mitt romney said about that 47% of the country he says can't be counted on to meet its responsibility. it's that part of the country that romney has dismissed as free-loaders, moochers, takers. people, especially veteran families, people retired on social security, regular americans, that is, don't like being dismissed that way, injury added by insult. i'm joined by chuck todd and howard fineman with "the huffington post." the latest poll shows among likely voters the president leads 49% to 46% for romney. that's down net two points from two weeks ago when the pres
enacted by the first congress. but it sat dormant for 170 odd years. then some civil rights type folks picked it up and human rights type folks and started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign, the defendant is foreign, and the tort took place in some foreign place and they are bringing it to u.s. courts. so a paraguayan plaintiff and a pair of wayne defendant and it took place in her way. so the ticket to a u.s. -- a paraguayan plaintiff and a paraguayan defendant and it took place in paraguay. so they take it to the u.s. in this particular case, k iobal takes place in nigeria. and the nigerian government mistreated me, torture and so forth and these will companies, foreign oil companies, were complice it, helping the nigerian government do this to me. so i am wanting to sue the oil companies in federal court. and the oil companies defendants say that this does not apply to corporations. you cannot sue a corporation under this statute. that was their claim last year at the supreme court and the u.s. supreme court heard arguments in the case and did something very unusual.
, engaged the senators in discussion of how he felt about the issues, and it became clear he felt the civil rights act, a thomas just think, he thought there was no such thing as a right to privacy to the constitution, and the senate by a vote of 58-42 said to conservative and he was voted down. ronald reagan nominated instead to that seat anthony kennedy, who was serving a liberal but was certainly no robert bork either. and he has had a long and distinguished career as, now the swing vote on the court. and that really, that set, that really set up the rehnquist years. accord which i wrote about in my last book, "the nine," and when i started looking at the supreme court in a serious way as a writer, i was inspired by book that i'm sure is familiar to many of you called the brethren by scott armstrong and bob woodward, really a great book, first real behind the scenes book of the supreme court. and 15, the theme of the book was also justices, regardless of politics couldn't stand were in burger. they thought he was at pompous jerk. that sort of contention has been the rule more than the ex
decisions of our time in july the justices returned from their break and begin a new term dominated by civil rights issues. joining me from the supreme court, nbc news justice correspondent pete williams. pete, we're talking about major cases that will reshape potentially reshape policy for the united states on affirmative action, voting rights, and on gay marriage. >> very much so. let's begin with affirmative action president the court will hear that case next week. every selective university in america uses it in some manner to achieve a racially diverse campus. this is a case from the university of texas. a young high school student there did not qualify automatically as the top 10% of graduates in texas do for admission, so she was looked at in in the remainder of the other 25% of the class, race is a factor, says that's unconstitutional. nine years ago the supreme court gave the green light to colleges to use affirmative action if there were no race neutral methods to get to diversity. the question is whether the court has changed and become more conservative when they look at it they
released audiotapes that show kennedy's real views on the civil rights movement, cuban missile crisis and george romney. all of that when "now" starts in a mere 180 seconds. want to try to crack it? yeah, that's the way to do it! now we need a little bit more... a little bit more vanilla? this is great! [ male announcer ] at humana, we believe there's never been a better time to share your passions... because the results... are you having fun doing this? yeah. that's a very nice cake! [ male announcer ] well, you can't beat them. [ giggles ] ohh! you got something huh? whoa... [ male announcer ] humana understands the value of spending time together that's a lot of work getting that one in! let's go see the birdies. [ male announcer ] one on one, sharing what you know. let's do it grandpa. that's why humana agents will sit down with you, to listen and understand what's important to you. it's how we help you choose the right humana medicare plan for you. because when your medicare is taken care of, you can spend more time sharing your passions. wow. [ giggles ] [ male announ
could weaken if not entirely strike that down which would be an enormous change in a landmark civil rights law. >> take us inside the supreme court and how this works and how they decide what cases get done when and when we might hear some of these decisions. >> well, it's the same procedure. and it's unusual. because if you are in a state, the state supreme court must hear your case. not true here. the supreme court decides for the most part which cases to hear. it takes four votes mong the justices to grand a case. of course, takes five votes to win out of the nine. they confer on which cases they want to talk about. then they vote and then we hear about it on days like today when we get the orders list. but the reason i say with some confidence that they'll take the voting rights act case is because of the way the federal law works. if you get turned down by the federal government, the congress virtually requires the supreme court to hear those. i think it's likely they'll take up the voting rights challenge and the defense of marriage. >> pete williams, always good to see you. t
guaranteed act, on par with the civil-rights of the 1960's. host: john from illinois. caller: the only problem that i have is about the tax issue. the reason why i say that is our taxes in this country have never been set up to be fair. what they were set up for was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes. working-class and the port were supposed to pay the majority of theirs in homeowners' taxes, city and state taxes -- ordering class and the poor. everything is out of sorts. when you are on fixed income and these states will have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government will have such a lower one. anybody i fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator that costs $400, will have about a $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. the ones it will hurt our people that are retired, people that are on disability, things like that. otherwise, i am completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul in 1988. i voted for paul brown. i think he -- i can remember what year it was that he ran as a libertarian. once.ed for ross p
with the civil-rights of the 1960's. host: john from illinois. john is an independent. hey there. caller: the only problem that i have is about the tax issue. the reason why i say that is our taxes in this country have neverwhat they were set up for was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes. working-class and the port were supposed to pay the majority of theirs in homeowners' taxes, city and state taxes -- ordering class and the poor. everything is out of sorts. when you are on fixed income and these states will have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government will have such a lower one. anybody i fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator that costs $400, will have about a $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. the ones it will hurt our people that are retired, people that are on disability, things like that. otherwise, i am completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul in 1988. i voted for paul brown. i think he -- i can remember what year it was that he ran as a libertarian. i voted for ross perot once. i am
, they give a lot of money to civil- rights organizations like jesse jackson and the n.a.a.c.p. i am one who supports pumping capital into the community so we can create jobs and small businesses. the young lady is on point with that. it has been an uphill battle for me to get african-americans to see in general that it is the new civil rights challenge. i'm so glad the banks do have regulation, because they tend to exploit black and brown communities. i'm so glad are our alternatives community banks and credit unions now. keep up the good work, young lady. thank you. host: for more information about what your group is doing and you are the director of the program, ptrust.org is one of the websites. caller: a lady called about not being able to have a bank account because there was a minimum balance she had to maintain. i belonged tour credit union for years and the minimum balance is $5. when my children were in high school, they wanted to manage their own money and put their money in wachovia. my daughter had a conniption when she put a hundred dollars in and the next time she made a depos
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 85 (some duplicates have been removed)